26 March, 2009

Vampire porn for women

In a traditional sense, porn is defined as “something with no literary or artistic value other than to stimulate sexual desire,” according to the Webster’s dictionary definition.

“Twilight,” the hit vampire series by Stephenie Meyer, is precisely that. The books offer nothing more than female escapism complete with a price tag, sleek dust jacket and a complementary bookmark.

The escapism is expressed via the caricaturized romance between Bella, a teenage girl who bears a suspicious resemblance to series’ author, and Edward, a century-old sparkling vampire who can’t decide whether he wants to kiss Bella or eat her.

Though the series is often labeled ‘pornographic,’ the text is surprisingly devoid of explicit sex.

But Twilight’s brand of porn, otherwise known as “girl porn,” does not rely on graphic material to captivate its female audience. Rather, this special type of porn manifests itself in the form of emotional binges, excessive romanticizing and interaction with impossibly perfect male characters.

Girl porn has existed for years in the various forms, from the clever and sophisticated Jane Austen and Charlotte Bronte novels to the less tactful bodice-rippers by garden-variety romance novelists. Both kinds have had their share of success, though neither has claimed the limelight the way “Twilight” has.

It’s gaudy success has aggravated seasoned novelists. “Stephenie Meyer can’t write worth a darn,” Stephen King told USA Weekend this past February. “[Twilight] is exciting and it’s thrilling and it’s not particularly threatening because it’s not overtly sexual.” Read more >>

3 comments:

Aspasia said...

I love the way the article completely acted as though Anne Rice doesn't exist. Her Vampire Chronicles were the first "vampire porn" for modern women. Of course the movie adaptation with all those GORGEOUS, SEXY men in it. And let's not forget Bram Stoker's Dracula. I know more women who have read that book (and swooned) than men. But I guess Twilight gets all the attention because it conforms to more acceptable views of women's sexuality: ie. not at all lusty, desired, seductive, aggressive or animalistic.

I had no urge whatsoever to read that pile of caca called Twilight.

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badgirl33 said...

I did not read the books either, I'm not into this vampire genre. Although I've seen Interview with a vampire once